Do you know someone with Narcissistic Personality Disorder (NPD) or Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD)? If so, do they have a capacity to love? Can they experience feelings of empathy and compassion towards others? Or are they so self-involved that they can't even see another person's feelings as separate from their own? I'm going to answer these questions by bringing in experts who have studied these conditions and their effects on people who live with them.

Dr. Ramani Durvasula:

Dr. Ramani Durvasula is a clinical psychologist, author, and TV personality. She is a professor of psychology at California State University, Long Beach.

She has been a regular guest on The View, The Today Show, Good Morning America, and other news programs and talk shows.

Dr. Durvasula received her Bachelor’s degree in Psychology with Magna Cum Laude honors from the University of California Santa Barbara (UCSB) where she graduated magna cum laude as well – an achievement that was only accomplished by 8% of all students who graduated from UCSB during her time there! She then went on to earn her Master’s Degree in Clinical Psychology from Claremont Graduate University (CGU). In addition to these degrees she also managed to write several books including “Disordered No More: 5 Steps To Self-Health & Miraculous Change” which reached #1 Best Seller status in both Psychology/Self Help categories on Amazon!

Empathy is a key ingredient to love.

Empathy is the ability to understand and share the feelings of another. It’s what makes you want to help people and care for them, because you can put yourself in their shoes.

Empathy is a key ingredient to love. It’s what drives people who have it to want to be with someone who also has it—and vice versa. When two empathetic people come together, they create an intimate bond that is based on mutual understanding and respect for each other's feelings and needs (which are often very similar).

If a person lacks empathy (NPDs), they do not have the capacity to love another person.

If a person lacks empathy (NPDs), they do not have the capacity to love another person. Without empathy, all relationships become transactional and driven by self-interest.

Empathy is the ability to understand others' feelings and thoughts. People who have NPDs are often described as callous or indifferent toward others’ needs and feelings. They may even seem robotic in their interactions with others because they lack a sense of emotional warmth or intimacy in their relationships with others.

People with BPD are often in therapy because they no longer know how to love, especially in an effective and healthy way.

People with BPD are often in therapy because they no longer know how to love, especially in an effective and healthy way. If someone has BPD, their emotions can be so intense that it becomes unhealthy for themselves or others around them. They may feel like their heart is being ripped out of their chest, or that the world is ending because of what happened five seconds ago.

But there is hope for you! You can learn how to love yourself and others more effectively by working through your issues with a professional therapist who has experience treating personality disorders like Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD).

BPDs have the capacity to love (because of the ability for empathy), but sometimes their emotions are so intense that it becomes unhealthy for themselves or others around them.

BPDs have the capacity to love (because of the ability for empathy), but sometimes their emotions are so intense that it becomes unhealthy for themselves or others around them.

Love is not just a feeling, rather it is a verb that requires action in order to be real. When your Borderline partner says they love you, what does their behavior look like? Does he or she act out of anger and say words that come from a place of hurt or fear? Or do they show up as someone who uplifts, encourages and supports you in ways that continually build your sense of self worth and pride? These are some questions to ask yourself when trying to discern if your Borderline partner truly loves you or if he/she simply wants something from you (sex, money etc.)

NPDs do not have the ability to love, whereas BPDs have the capacity to love but may not know how to love effectively.

In my experience, the most common question people ask about NPDs is whether or not they can love. I’ve also been asked this question by BPDs who are trying to understand why their partner doesn’t love them and how they can get their partner to do so.

The answer is that NPDs don’t have the ability to love. When an NPD says “I love you,” she means that she loves being in a relationship with you because it makes her feel important and special. In other words, she loves herself through you! If this sounds like narcissism, that's because it is--she only loves herself through your admiration of her and what she has done for you (or believes she will do for you). She does not genuinely care about your happiness or welfare in any holistic way--only if such things benefit her directly by making her feel superior or superior-in-potential ("my spouse will make an excellent CEO").

If an NPD tells me "I love him," I know exactly what he means: He wants something from me (money) and he thinks he might be able to get it if I believe him when he says this word over and over again until either we become friends or one day soon when our relationship falls apart miserably because he wanted something else instead of friendship--and now neither one of us knows where we stand since neither one had ever really known each other well enough at all before becoming close friends!

Conclusion

The bottom line is that both NPDs and BPDs can love, but they may have a hard time showing it. The difference is that NPDs have a lack of empathy that makes it difficult for them to be in relationships or show any emotion at all. BPDs are often in therapy because they no longer know how to love, especially in an effective and healthy way.