Narcissistic personality disorder is a mental health condition that affects how people think, feel, and behave. People with narcissistic personality disorder are self-centered, lack empathy for others, and have an inflated sense of importance. Like all personality disorders, it is diagnosed based on a person's behavior and thoughts over time.

Narcissistic personality disorder is a spectrum disorder, with severity ranging from mild to severe.

Narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) is a spectrum disorder, meaning that the severity of symptoms can range from mild to severe.

Mild narcissism is characterized by an inflated sense of self-importance and a constant need for attention and admiration. Its sufferers may have a hard time dealing with criticism and may be prone to bouts of anger when their needs aren’t met. Moderate narcissists are more likely to use manipulation as a means to get what they want; they also tend to be more sensitive than their mild counterparts. Severely narcissistic individuals are often very manipulative in nature; they’ll do whatever it takes to get their way — even if this means hurting others or exposing them to danger — all in order to be seen favorably by others and gain power over others.

The first two types (milder NPD being one type) are not necessarily bad people, but they do suffer some impairment regarding social interactions because of their inability to put themselves in other peoples' shoes (a common feature among narcissists). They're also less likely than normal people with no history of mental illness whatsoever who were raised under similar circumstances where mothering was concerned -- both inside out outside home environment -- would show empathy towards others before themselves since empathy requires putting yourself into someone else's situation emotionally before acting upon or judging them accordingly according "what" happened at that moment."

A person with narcissism has an inflated sense of their own importance and a need to be admired.

People with narcissistic personality disorder (NPD) have an inflated sense of their own importance. They believe they are superior to other people and have little regard for those around them.

A person with narcissism may appear to be very confident, but often this is a cover for being extremely fragile inside. Their self-esteem is dependent on the constant admiration of others and when they don’t get this admiration from others, it can be devastating for them.

These traits go hand in hand with someone who has NPD:

  • They crave attention from others and will go out of their way to get it by wearing expensive designer clothes or driving a flashy car for example;
  • They think only about themselves and how things affect them;
  • They feel entitled to special treatment because they consider themselves better than other people;
  • Their relationships lack intimacy or mutual respect;
  • They can be emotionally abusive towards their partners, family members or friends;

Narcissists are expert manipulators, and may lie about what happened.

Narcissists are expert manipulators and liars. They may lie about what happened, making their victims second-guess themselves and feel like they must be crazy or at fault for the narcissist's behavior.

If you're questioning if someone is a narcissist, here are some signs to look for:

  • Are they more focused on themselves than others?
  • Do they take advantage of others?
  • Do they have an inflated sense of self-importance?

Everyone can be manipulative at times, but people with narcissistic personality disorder tend to use manipulation as their primary way of relating to others.

Narcissists are good at manipulating and making others feel guilty. But let’s be clear: Everyone can be manipulative at times. We all manipulate to get what we want or need, to avoid conflict, or sometimes just for fun. In fact, people with healthy self-esteem don’t even think of it as manipulation; they see it as direct communication about what they want and need in the relationship.

However, people with narcissistic personality disorder tend to use manipulation as their primary way of relating to others — especially their romantic partners — because they lack empathy and don't care about how their actions affect other people's feelings or emotions.

Narcissists are personable at first, so they may be able to fool your friends and family, too.

People with narcissistic personality disorder can be personable at first, so they may be able to fool your friends and family, too. Narcissists are often charismatic, fun, exciting individuals who appear to have it all together in the beginning stages of a relationship with you. They may even appear to be the life of the party—they're witty, they make you feel good about yourself, they make other people laugh... they seem like awesome people.

But don't be fooled: As time goes on in your relationship with someone who has NPD (or is just plain narcissistic), it will become increasingly clear that this person has no interest in getting to know you or understanding where you're coming from—it's all about them and their needs being met at all times. If this happens to be your friend or family member—if he or she starts treating others poorly as well as yourself—please do not hesitate to contact us for help!

Narcissists are very good at blaming others for everything that goes wrong in their lives.

The narcissist is often so good at blaming others for everything that goes wrong in his or her life, that he or she can even convince themselves of their own lies. They will blame you for things out of your control (ex: "if only you had been more supportive!"), things that are actually his/her own fault (ex: "You're the reason I can't get any work done"), and things that are 100% his/her fault (ex: "It's all your fault").

The truth is, narcissists do this because they need to feel like they have power over something—and if it's not them having power over anyone else, then they'll take any excuse to take control of what's going on around them by blaming someone else for their problems.

People with narcissistic personality disorder often try to control those around them.

People with narcissistic personality disorder often try to control those around them. They may:

  • Try to control what you do, who you talk to and what you wear.
  • Be overly critical or criticize you in an attempt to keep others from seeing your good qualities.
  • Make you feel guilty if they think that it will help them gain control of a situation or relationship.

Because they have such a high opinion of themselves, they usually can't take criticism well.

When you are dealing with a narcissist, it's important to remember that they have an extremely high opinion of themselves. So when you criticize or point out a flaw in them, they tend to take it as an attack on their entire character. Because of this, they can be very sensitive and defensive when criticized. Furthermore, because they are so used to getting their way and having people do things for them, it’s easy for them to use manipulation tactics like guilt trips or passive aggression if someone refuses to cater to their needs or demands (the same goes for being overly aggressive).

A narcissistic person may seem to care less about what others think, but more under the surface they're extremely self-conscious and feel very threatened by negative opinions of them. They will often work hard to present a perfect image of themselves to the world.

A narcissistic person may seem to care less about what others think, but more under the surface they're extremely self-conscious and feel very threatened by negative opinions of them. They will often work hard to present a perfect image of themselves to the world.

They'll do things like delete comments on Facebook that are critical of them or write scathing replies when someone leaves an unflattering review on a social media platform. They'll also be constantly checking their own posts for any signs of negativity and take it personally if someone doesn't 'like' every post they make, even if it's totally unrelated stuff like selfies or photos with friends at the beach.

In addition to this, narcissists have difficulty making eye contact because they're afraid other people will see right through them (which might be true). This can come across as aloofness or coldness; however, it can also lead to feeling insecure around strangers if we don't know how others perceive us in person yet because we've been so focused on our online presence instead."

People with narcissism can lash out if you accuse them or try to confront them about it - or even if you don't do anything at all; they just feel like attacking you for no reason.

There are many ways in which people with narcissism can lash out at others. They may be so unaware of their own behavior that they don't realize how it affects other people, but even if they do realize it, it's likely that someone with this disorder will not care about the feelings of others. Narcissists have very little empathy for anyone besides themselves and sometimes those who are most close to them (family members). Most narcissists feel like they are above everyone else and entitled to everything they want in life without having to work hard for anything.

If someone you love seems obsessive and controlling, it's important to do some research before deciding how best to help them.

Narcissistic abuse is a serious problem. It's not your fault, and you can get help. This can be difficult because you've been conditioned to believe that narcissists are the most important people in your life. Even if they are not in your life anymore, they may still have control over how much money you make, or whether or not they will take care of their children if they're divorced from you. But there are legal remedies available to help victims of narcissistic abuse find closure, recover financially, and move on with their lives after being manipulated by a narcissist for years on end. If someone in your family is suffering from this kind of situation, it's important that they know they're not alone—and that there are resources available to help them take back control over their lives!

Conclusion

It is estimated that 1% of the population suffers from NPD. That may seem like a small number, but it means that approximately three million people in the United States alone have this disorder. In fact, NPD is so common that many mental health professionals consider it to be one of the most prevalent personality disorders. Even if you do not know anyone with NPD yourself, chances are you've heard about it or seen it on TV shows like "Law & Order" where they portray criminal acts carried out by narcissistic individuals.